Blogs

Be the first person to like this.
Instead of focusing on what people are doing wrong; highlight and celebrate what they naturally do well – their strengths.  Learn your Team’s Strengths by having them take the CliftonStrengths Assessment. Then have a facilitator compile the results of the whole team and lead a discussion on how the different strengths of each staff member can lend to the success of a your organization’s operations.  The outcome – Individual team members will gain a better understanding of what motivates or drives their peers, and they will learn how to work together more effectively by utilizing their respective strengths.
0 comments
1 person likes this.
It is important for your whole Board to move together in the same direction.  Each Board member is responsible for actively participating in and approving decisions that guide the organization’s strategic direction.  Specifically, they are responsible for: Insuring comprehensive organizational planning occurs. Participating in the strategic planning process. Assessing the merits of the planning process and results. Formally approving agreed upon outcomes or roadmap. Using the roadmap goals as a guide for budgeting and other priorities. Tracking the plan’s implementation and the organization’s progress based on the established roadmap.
0 comments
Be the first person to like this.
Collect data first!  Strategic planning efforts should begin with research; a thorough review of the organization’s current state. In essence, a 360 Review.  Specifically, your planning consultant/facilitator should:  Examine all governing documents to include, but not limited to the organizational structure, bylaws, board and administrative policies, committee charters, financial statements, reserve study reports, and minutes from Board meetings and committees over the past year. Research national or regional industry best practices and the trends that are impacting or could have an impact on the organization’s operations and ability to deliver services. ...
0 comments
Be the first person to like this.
Considering a survey for your community? Here are some things to keep in mind: Your community survey should be focused and not include “everything but the kitchen sink”. Do not ask “nice to know” questions”.  Instead, ask questions that will provide data the Board can use to make impactful resource decisions to improve community facilities, services and boost home values.  As a first step, identify topics that are of greatest interest to you and your Board such as: Common area maintenance and improvements Recreation programming and offerings Design standards and maintenance Communications Community engagement and involvement Board and committee ...
0 comments

Assessments

Be the first person to like this.
Has anyone had experience with assessments? We are going through assessments but not everyone wants to pay their share.
0 comments
1 person likes this.
Effective communication is vital to a community’s success.  Through better communication, boards and managers can operate the community more efficiently together and build trust with residents.  However, in an ever-changing world, it can be challenging to choose communication channels that are best suited to your community.  In this post, you’ll learn the importance of having multiple ways to communicate and common communication channels. Why it’s important to have multiple ways to communicate: Better reach and engagement - Your message will get across more effectively when you communicate through channels your residents prefer.  Meet different ...
0 comments

Board

Be the first person to like this.
The first message I saw here today regarded the use of the word “Board” as a synonym for “Association “.  They are not synonymous.  Our tiny board has usurped the owner’s authority. I am wondering if it is permissible for me to send a letter of introduction to my neighbors and a brief summary of issues, responsibilities, and the authority we have as members of our association. People are scared.  I am finding it increasingly more difficult to be silent even as I am forced to pay ridiculous sums to the board attorney.  However, I am disabled. Most recently Covid left me with pulmonary embolisms and I am just tired. I can’t go door to door.  I’d ...
0 comments
3 people like this.
I hear it all the time, not just from association members and leaders, but from management companies, community managers, and even HOA attorneys: “Ray is the Rio Crossing board president.” But I've reviewed dozens of association bylaws, and none of them authorizes a president of the board of directors .  The officers - including the president - are officers of the association .  While some people might think the board and the association are one and the same, they're not.  And I'm sure most of you who have been in the association business know this to some extent, but many of you don't often make the distinction clear when you're talking with homeowners, ...
3 comments
Be the first person to like this.
Efficiency has been and continues to be a top priority for property and community managers. According to a notable property management industry report, efficiency matters because associations expect property managers to perform more services in the same amount of time. Interestingly, while it is still very high on the list for about 1/4 of managers, fewer see it as a primary concern today. In 2017, 49% of managers were trying to prioritize efficiency. Now, only about 25% are.      It’s not that these professionals don’t care about working smarter. The more likely explanation for this decline is that community managers have found solutions to help them operate ...
0 comments
Be the first person to like this.
The holiday season is a time of celebration. Homeowners often take part in the celebration by decorating their homes with a variety of decorations and lights to suit the season. However, these holiday decorations are often left out long after the season ends. This article will provide an overview of what a homeowners association can do to prevent these decorations from staying up all year without limiting the festivities. The board of directors of a homeowners’ association has a fiduciary duty to homeowners to maintain the community to the level that homeowners expected when they purchased homes within the association. Part of this duty entails regulating ...
0 comments
Be the first person to like this.
Almost exactly one year ago, I published Board Discipline: Has your Board been Naughty or Nice this Year ? While thinking through major themes from common interest community discussion over the last twelve months, a timely and fitting year-end post on the CAI Members Forum catalyzed this year's message.  A homeowner decided to fly the Flag of the United States of America upside down.  The original poster suggests that their Board would like the flag flown "with the stars up" and that several protest signs were removed in response to a violation letter (presumably asserting a rule that yard signs are disallowed).  Those signs are now taped to ...
1 comment
Be the first person to like this.
Collect data first!  Strategic planning efforts should begin with research; a thorough review of the organization’s current state. In essence, a 360 Review.  Specifically, your planning consultant/facilitator should:  Examine all governing documents to include, but not limited to the organizational structure, bylaws, board and administrative policies, committee charters, financial statements, reserve study reports, and minutes from Board meetings and committees over the past year. Research national or regional industry best practices and the trends that are impacting or could have an impact on the organization’s operations and ability to deliver services. ...
0 comments

Stay on Target

Be the first person to like this.
If you are serving on a non-profit or community association board you have 10 key responsibilities to your fellow board members and the organization:    1) Fulfill the mission and purposes of the organization, and advocate for them. 2) Select the general manager or chief executive. 3) Support and evaluate the general manager or chief executive. 4) Ensure effective planning. 5) Monitor and strengthen programs and services. 6) Ensure adequate financial resources. 7) Protect assets and provide financial oversight. 8) Build and sustain a competent board. 9) Ensure legal and ethical integrity. 10) Enhance and organization’s public standing.
0 comments
1 person likes this.
Ask a question or bring a concern to the collective, 2021 will bring new challenges to our industry.  I would like to post a platform for discussion that highlights areas of concern surrounding turf maintenance.  These areas range from  fertilization,  fungus, pest control and more.  The bottom line is what can be done to protect investments and maintain a balance in the environments and budgets.
11 comments
Be the first person to like this.
The best method to get teams and the individuals within them to move forward in the right direction is by bringing them together to learn about their unique strengths; aspirations for the jobs they are performing; preferred operational norms; and defined priority goals they can collaboratively achieve.   Instead of focusing on what people are doing wrong; highlight and celebrate what they naturally do well – their strengths.  Learn your Team’s Strengths by having them take the CliftonStrengths Assessment. Then have a facilitator compile the results of the whole team and lead a discussion on how the different strengths of each staff member can lend to the ...
0 comments
1 person likes this.
Pose “learning” questions to your Strategic Planning Stakeholders group that will provide you with candid and valuable insight to the current and future operations of your organization.   Allow respondents to give this input anonymously to an outside facilitator.  People are more willing to lend their view or “give voice” to someone who will not judge but listen.  The facilitator can tabulate and analyze the information to identify common themes that will formulate the key areas of focus of your strategic plan.
0 comments
Be the first person to like this.
Establish a strategic Planning schedule that is deliberate, collaborative, and builds synergies among you, your leadership team, and the Board.  The process of developing a strategic plan is just that, a process.  If done correctly, it also builds a shared understanding and commitment to navigate the organization or community in the right direction.
0 comments
2 people like this.
In setting out to develop a strategic plan for your organization or community, one of the first tasks is identifying who will be working with you to lead the effort – your Strategic Planning Committee.  It should not be one person but instead a concert of people who will help champion the process and monitor the implementation of the final product.  As such, representatives from your Board, committees, and staff leadership team should be part of this important committee.
0 comments
Be the first person to like this.
This blog was originally posted 12/25/20 on condoconnection.org . Ho ho ho, what a year 2020 has been! Like all of the world, multi-family residential communities have been tested in a number of ways. For many communities, that means less access to amenities, but hopefully greater access to the inner-workings of your association as meetings and documents have transitioned from in-person and hard-co pies to online and readily available from the convenience of your phone, tablet or computer. All those changes aside, has your b oard of d irectors been naughty or nice this year?! Serving on a nonprofit board of directors at condominium and ...
0 comments
1 person likes this.
Today marks nearly one month since I was nominated president of my condo building. It also marks nearly one month that I've been repeatedly stressed and worried.  I've had many rough nights.  Waking up at 2:30 am in a funk. A month of asking myself more than once, "What in the name of God was I thinking?  Why did I agree to do this?" I have no shame in admitting - I am VERY unknowledgeable when it comes to this position.  I've only been living in my condo for 8 months!  While I'm not a total noob to "home" living - I AM new to home living in a home OF MY OWN.  So imagine me... learning about my own home... and in addition having to learn about the ENTIRE building ...
2 comments